How come in some words 'gh' provides the same sound as 'f'? How did they recognize that and why didn't they just usage f instead of gh?


Not good at English however given that nobody has actually answered, I discovered this. The last article kinda answers the "why" component of your question.

You are watching: Words with gh that sound like f


Thanks!!

Here is the gist of what's on that page for the lazy:

Different letters blfinish together to make a selection of phonemes (sounds) in English. Sometimes the exact same letters develop various sounds (for example the 'ea' sounds in 'beach' and in 'bread' are produced utilizing the very same letters, but make various phoneme sounds). This is part of what makes English a facility language to learn, the sounds are quite complicated. Tright here is no hard and quick reasoning as to why in many situations. You just have to look at the bordering letters and make the choice

A 'gh' combicountry is supplied in a variety of phonemes:

The digraph (2 letter blend) sound 'gh' cough laugh rough trough enough

The trigraph (3 letter blend) phoneme sound "igh" light high bright

the quad (4 letter blend) phoneme sound 'ough' bough plough


13
Share
ReportSave
level 1
· 8y

Spelling came to be standardized in the 15th century and also points were pronounced veeery in a different way then. The "gh" sound provided to be pronounced as that kind of Gerguy hacking sound like in "Bach," but English has obviously lost that sound given that then.

That's additionally why "gh" is in words prefer "night" which supplied to be pronounced even more like "NEEKT."

If you ever before wonder how English used to be pronounced, the modern-day spelling of a lot of words deserve to tell you.


4
Share
ReportSave
level 1
· 8y

My answer would be that the spelling more than likely predays the pronunciation. I'm Dutch, and also our spelling for, say, "laugh" is similar: "lach". But the final sound is pronounced choose a hard "g" (prefer in the Scottish "loch"). Similarly, "cough" = "kuch" , "enough" = "genoeg" (exact same final sound as "ch") and so on.

My guess is that the English pronounced it favor us/Germans in the past, and also spelled it properly via "gh" to reflect that. Then the pronunciation adjusted, however the spelling didn't. It would be easier to change the spelling to "laff" but once it involves spelling, yet spelling is dictated by learned scholars and also therefore sreduced to change than pronunciation.


3
Share
ReportSave
level 1
· 8y

Historical linguist below.

It's a because of a combination of spelling conventions and also language readjust. Let's take tough as an example.

In Old English, tough was toh, pronounced via a /x/-phoneme. Such a sound no much longer exists in English, but it still does in, for circumstances, the Gerguy word lach (right here is a pronunciation of lach).

In Middle English, until the late 1400s, hardly any type of spelling conventions existed; human being pretty much created the way they wanted. But roughly the late 1400s, spelling was starting to be conventionalised, and also the spelling of all sorts of words was resolved. For the /x/-sound, the spelling was preferred.

And while toh adjusted to tough (and also the pronunciation of the last consonant through it), the spelling continued to be the same.

That's also why there's a in night. The Old English word was niht, and a spelling of was favored for that word, but when the /x/ sound was shed (bring about Present-day English night), the spelling continued to be the very same.

See more: Not A Care In The World By Rebecca Kilgore, Not Have A Care In The World


3
Share
ReportSave
level 1
· 8y

I'm sure there is a true answer, however my de facto response is that English is just a horrid language.

Take the 'f' sound from the 'gh' in toughTake the 'i' sound from the 'o' in womenTake the 'sh' sound from the 'ti' in condition

Placed those together and you have "ghoti" or phonetically the exact same as "fish"

More pertained to your question, I can offer you 5 examples of inconsistencies through 'gh'

bough rhymes via cow

cough rhymes with off

stormy rhymes through puff

though rhymes via Jo

with rhymes with too


1
Share
ReportSave
level 2
· 8y

"Ghoti" can likewise be pronounced as "...":

The "gh" from "dough"

The "o" from "people"

The "t" from "ballet"

The "i" from "business"


5
Share
ReportSave
Continue this thread 


*

r/NoStupidQuestions
Ask away!
2.5m
Members


10.6k

Online


Created Feb 2, 2013
Join
*
*
*
*

*

Top posts november 30th 2013Top write-ups of november, 2013Top posts 2013
helplutz-heilmann.info coinslutz-heilmann.info premiumlutz-heilmann.info gifts
aboutcareerspressadvertiseblogTermsContent policyPrivacy policyMod policy
Back to Top