I don"t know about the second and third one but I can speculate that the first one ("suffice to say") is not obsolete, at least in the USA. For instance, in an episode of the TV series, Dexter, there is a conversation that goes like this:

: Deb found out what I am. She knows everything.

You are watching: Suffice to say or suffice it to say

: Everything? How?

: It"s a long story. Just suffice to say she"s not handling it wlutz-heilmann.info.

So, I assume in similar situations it would be safe to use the phrase "suffice to say", yet I don"t know when I"d need to switch to another alternative (after all, I don"t like to mess with the Mr. Potato Head!).


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edited Jun 16 "20 at 9:11
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asked Aug 13 "13 at 17:47
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All of the forms are valid, and in common usage in English.

"It suffices to say" and "suffice it to say" are the same, just with a word-order inversion for stylistic purposes. "Suffice it to say" is more old-fashioned, but it seems to be coming back into fashion (since about the mid 1950s), and is now more common than the word ordering "it suffices to say" in both American and British English.

"Suffice to say" is also valid; in this case the "it" has merely been elided, and in my experience is more common in speech, whereas "suffice it to say" is more common in writing.

The following is an NGram that shows that all of the forms are relatively common, and you will be widely understood by native English speakers whichever form you happen to choose.

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answered Aug 13 "13 at 23:32
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MattMatt
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I think you"ll always be better off saying "suffice it to say". Options 1 and 2 seem quite odd to my ear, though at least option 1 could be considered lutz-heilmann.infoipsis. There"s a helpful article on the topic here.


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answered Aug 13 "13 at 20:03
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Tyler James YoungTyler James Young
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The only form that makes grammatical sense is "it suffices to say". The other forms may be in general use, but that doesn"t make them correct; example: "ain"t".


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edited Dec 18 "17 at 3:54
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Maryam
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answered Dec 17 "17 at 23:12
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