What is the distinction in between the over adverbial modifier of place and "IN the picture" if any?

In "Games for Vocabulary Practice" by Felicity O"Dlutz-heilmann.info and Katie Head (Cambridge,2003) I have actually come across this expression more than when reading the guidelines for running tasks, e.g. "Student B preoften tends to be the perboy ON the picture".

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The normal point is "in the picture" as

In the photo we see Edinburgh Castle.

In English a photo is seen as a space; and also a landscape, in fact, depicts a room and subsequently you say: "In the picture we see a hilly countryside with a river and green meadows through lamb and in the background tbelow is a little village."

In other langueras a picture or painting might be viewed not as room, but as a room, and "on the picture" is offered in Gerguy.


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When describing the world or points which appear in a photo, we use "in".

If you were to use the expression "on the picture", it would certainly the majority of likely be to describe somepoint that was not part of the photo originally, yet is currently on it.

"Your coffee cup is sitting on the picture!""I left out the crayons, and my toddler attracted on the image you left. So sorry!"

ETA: In North American English, the instance you offered would be ungrammatical. I check out the book was publimelted in England, though. Perhaps it is thought about an acceptable building there.


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edited Oct 28 "14 at 16:24
answered Oct 28 "14 at 12:50
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michlutz-heilmann.infoemichlutz-heilmann.infoe
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I have never heard the expression "on the picture" to suppose "among the things|persons recorded by the electronic camera here". For that interpretation, it is always "in the picture".

Who is this perboy in the picture?

One can say "shown on the picture" to suppose "which shows up in this image".

Point to the stselection expansion of foliage, shown on this image, which you think to be the gangster"s camouflaged hideout.

One deserve to create an essay around a paint or photograph or movie, and say that one was composing an essay "on the picture", i.e. "around the picture".


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edited Oct 28 "14 at 13:22
answered Oct 28 "14 at 12:21
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TᴚoɯɐuoTᴚoɯɐuo
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This is the very same in British English as in North Amerideserve to English, so the example sentence is ungrammatical - the explacountry offered by michlutz-heilmann.infoe applies equally to both.

As a aboriginal speaker, I would assume that this is not strictly a grammatical error (interpretation the author believed it was correct), but a typographical one (definition the writer did not notice their mistake). Since you cite seeing it more than when I would suspect a copy/pasting error.

(It might seem odd for this to be missed by the editor, however these points do occur.)


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answered Oct 28 "14 at 16:55
NyeNye
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Unit 8 Describing peoplethe instructions reads

Warm-up

1 Give each pair of students an envelope containing a collection of picture cards and also ask them to spread them out in front of them. Choose a photo and pretfinish to be the person on the picture. Describe yourself in 5 sentences without discussing your name. E.g. I have actually fair hair, not dark hair. I am a woman. My hair is short, not long. I am wearing __ , and so on After 5 sentences, ask students to guess that the person is.

<...>

Main activity

Give each student an envelope containing a set of photo cards. Students then play in their pairs. Student A puts all their pictures face up on the table. Tlutz-heilmann.info Student B to choose one image from their own envelope and look at it without reflecting it to Student A. Student B pretends to be the perchild on the image.

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The expression “... on the picture” as it is used is grammatical in its conmessage. It is short for on the photo card. The writer has actually omitted card from the sentence because it was pointed out in the instructions: a set of image cards

Tbelow are various other instances once making use of on with picture, or image would fit in a teaching setting.

Focus students" attention on the photo.Student B must emphasis on the picture, and also describe it to their companion.Student A sticks the pets wright here they desire on the image.Student B privately draws a residence on the photo. (Although "in the picture" would certainly be more idiomatic)