One night in 1946, songwriter Joe Greene was asleep in Los Angeles and had a dream. Greene relates: “I was lying in bed with a broken arm. About two o’clock in the morning, I suddenly woke up – fifty percent asleep, fifty percent awake – then all of a sudden prefer a miracle, I witnessed a photo of the Indian in front of the Alamo. I woke up my wife. I could still write through my appropriate hand, so I started creating the melody, and my wife composed dvery own the lyrics as I told them to her. I finimelted the song in twenty minutes.”

The song was Across The Alley From The Alamo. The melody is lilting And cheery, but if you speak and also think about it, the music hardly goes through the subject issue, which is about a Navaho and also a pinto pony whose fate is to be run over one day by a train. It is a musical non-sequitur, however it does capture the droll melancholy that is San Antonio, house of the Alamo.

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You can think that only a indigenous San Antonian – a perchild that has lingered in the shade of the Alamo – might write a song favor Across The Alley From The Alamo. Not so. Joe Greene is a aboriginal child of Spokane, Washington and also a life-time resident of the West Coast. He has actually never watched the Alamo or ever before set foot in Texas. His song was born in an immediate and also it ended up being a hit nearly as quick.

As Greene tells the story, it was just a fluke of luck. He relates: “I had actually been doing songs for Nat Cole, so the following morning I visited see Nat’s manager, Carlos Gestel. He regulated Stan Kenton, Mel Tormé, Peggy Lee. I had 3 various other songs through me that I had actually written. I’m a pretty great singer, so I sang them. Well, Gastel, he constantly went by the seat of his pants. He sassist, ‘Joe, those are pretty excellent songs, yet do you have anypoint else?’ I told him I had simply written a little Western tune. I sang it; he said, ‘Wait a minute,’ picked up the phone and also dubbed Mickey Goldsen in New York – he’s a song publisher. I sang it for him over the phone. Mick shelp, ‘How a lot breakthrough perform you want?’ I named him a four-number development. When they dangled a carrot, I knew to grab. He shelp, ‘Send me a demo.’ That was a Tuesday morning. We referred to as up Tormé, that remained in tvery own, and told him to fulfill us at Eccles Recording Studio at the Pantages Theatre the next morning. Of course, he had actually been up late that night working, yet he met us at nine a.m. and he made the demo. Next off we got in touch via Tommy Rockwell, that was in Chicback via the Mills Brothers for a recording session. We played the demo for him over the phone. He said to sfinish the demo distinct delivery and also he’d hold up the recording session. And the remainder is history, right?

Well, not quite.

Tommy Rockwell called Greene on Thursday of that very same week. Greene might hear the Mills Brothers singing in the background. Another verse was needed for the song. Greene sat down and in around ten minutes wrote the additional verse – a stvariety set of words around Duz and Lux.

Now, anyone who came of age on Puff The Magic Dragon, Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds, and Day Tripper knows once a Navaho and also a horse are washing beans in soap powder (as in these lyrics), tright here has to be a surprise definition. Are we talking about drugs, around some kind if illicit habits here? Greene claims no.

But why Duz and Lux?

“It was just one of those kooky points that happen in this life,” says Greene.

The Mills Brothers variation was a hit recording, quickly complied with through charting versions by Woody Herman and Stan Kenton.

Joe Green wrote other successful songs, consisting of And Her Tears Flowed Like Wine and also Don’t Let The Sun Capture You Crying. Greene died in 1986 and also as much as we know, never experienced the Alamo or collection foot in Texas.

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And it all started through a dream.

THE LYRICSACROSS THE ALLEY FROM THE ALAMO (1946)Words and music by Joe Greene

Across the alley from the AlamoLived a pinto pony and also a NavajoWho sang a kind of Indian “Hi-de-ho”To the people passin’ byThe pright into invested his time a-swishin’ fliesAnd the Navajo watched the lazy skiesAnd very hardly ever did they ever before rest their eyesOn the civilization passin’ byOne day, they went a walkin’ alengthy the railroad trackThey were swishin’ not a-lookin’ Toot! Toot!, they never came backOh, throughout the alley from the AlamoWhen the summer sunlight decides to settle lowA fly sings an Indian “Hi-de-ho”To the world passing byAcross the alley from the AlamoLived a pinto pony and also a NavajoWho provided to bake frijoles in cornmeal doughFor the civilization passing byThey thought that they would make some straightforward bucksBy washin’ their frijoles in Duz and Lux,A pair of exceptionally conscientious clucksTo the human being passin’ byThen they took this cheap vacation, their shoes were poliburned brightNo, they never before heard the whistle, Toot! Toot! they’re clear out of sightOh, across the alley from the AlamoWhen the starlight beams its tender glowThe beams go to sleep and also then tbelow ain’t no doughFor the people passin’ byOne day, they went a walkin’ alengthy the railroad trackThey were swishin’ not a-lookin’ Toot! Toot!, they never before came backOh, across the alley from the AlamoWhen the summer sunlight decides to clear up lowA fly sings an Indian “Hi-de-ho”To the human being passin’ byAcross the alley from the Alamo

THE RECORDINGSMills Brothers Across The Alley From The AlamoWoody Herman and also his Orchestra (vocals by Woody Herguy, accompanied by The Four Chips) Across The Alley From The AlamoStan Kenton and his Orchestra (vocals by June Christy) Across The Alley From The Alamo